Poor spending habits: A major cause of the vicious cycle of borrowing.

Yesterday, I came across a very interesting article in the Daily Monitor Newspaper regarding peoples’ spending habits. I found it related to my previous article titled “Living within our means for a better tomorrow” and was therefore prompted to share it with you this day.

The phrase, “Failing to make ends meet ” is common in Uganda and it means that a person has got into a pattern where their income does not cover the money they spend month after month. In our book, “Make Sense of Your Money” we describe this situation as having more months at the end of the money- meaning the salary gets finished several days before the next pay cheque. 

Recently, a group of people attending a personal money management course that I was facilitating shared with me their major spending mistakes;

Living above means was a major spending mistake mentioned, for instance having expenses to an amount that is twice your income. Another was relying on anticipated income i.e one of the participants said his biggest spending mistake arose out of spending money in anticipation of future income. However, the most common mistake was  the “What will people say syndrome” where several participants said their spending mistake was that they spent money out of fear of the opinion of other people and they cited several examples to illustrate this issue. By James Abola.

Astala vista…

Living within our means for a better tomorrow.

Today, I was priviledged to attend a conference with the theme Power, Sex, and Money, the emphasis being on Money. Majority, if not all of the people in attendance were quite youthful, with some of them being students at university and others recently starting out in the job market.

The discussion at hand was very interesting and it involved the use of money in economic growth and development on a micro level. Very importantly though, it also encompassed how to make clean money that will last for years to come, in the process leading to progressive and sustainable macro economic development.

One of the guest speakers was Mr. Amos Wekesa, founder, Great Lakes Safaris ltd who also happens to be my mentor. He emphasised the importance of saving and living not only within, but also below our means.

He argued that this would potentially reduce the amount of debt that many people usually accumulate from unecessary liabilities like luxurious cars. These spending habits in many cases also result in the vicious cycle of borrowing. However; “When you save money, one day that money will save you.” Amos Wekesa added.

We should always endeavor to live within our means, and use the money that we have to make a positive and significant difference in our economy.

Until next time…

Is Economic freedom a mith?

In a society in which nearly everybody is dominated by somebody else’s mind or by a disembodied mind, it becomes increasingly difficult to learn the truth about the activities of governments and corporations, about the quality or value of products, or about the health of one’s own place and economy.

In such a society, also, our private economies will depend less and less upon the private ownership of real, usable property, and more and, more upon property that is institutional and abstract, beyond individual control, such as money, insurance policies, certificates of deposit, stocks and shares. And our private economies become more abstract, the mutual, free helps and pleasures of family and community life will be supplanted by a kind of displaced citizenship and by commerce with impersonal and self interested suppliers. Thus although we arenot slaves in name, and cannot be carried to market and sold as somebody else’s legal chattels, we are free only within narrow limits.

For all our talk about liberation and personal autonomy, there are few choices that we are free to make. What would bethe point, for example, if a majority of our people decided to be self-employed?

The great enemy of freedom is the alignment of political power with wealth. This alignment destroys the commonwealth that is, the natural wealth of localities and the local economies of household neighborhood, and community and so destroys democracy, of which the commonwealth is the foundation and practical means. Wendell Berry

Crane Bank’s takeover by DFCU Bank.

The Governor Bank Of Uganda (B.O.U), Tumusime Mutebile, in a letter dated 27th Jan 2017 stated that DFCU Bank  ltd had taken over the control and management of all assets and liabilities of Crane Bank ltd.

This didn’t come as a surprise to many since Crane Bank had as of 20th Oct 2016 been declared insolvent by the Central Bank (B.O.U). It was found to be undercapitalized with its liabilities grossly exceeding its assets.

This undercapitalization was found to be mainly due to the presence of Non-Performing loans. Many people were using short-term loans to finance long-term investments like building houses for rent thus failing to pay back these loans in time.

Nonetheless, the Central Bank ought to be applauded for doing a good job in making sure that depositors didn’t lose their money and the financial sector was kept relatively stable.The Governor B.O.U said;  “B.O.U reassures the public that it will continue to protect depositors’ interests and maintain the stability of the financial sector.”

However, inspite of this assurance, some Economists predict that Crane Bank’s collapse could have dire effects on Uganda’s economy with foreign investors leaving the Ugandan market.

Will people also resort to keeping their money under pillows and mattresses? …your guess is as good as mine.