Living within our means for a better tomorrow.

Today, I was priviledged to attend a conference with the theme Power, Sex, and Money, the emphasis being on Money. Majority, if not all of the people in attendance were quite youthful, with some of them being students at university and others recently starting out in the job market.

The discussion at hand was very interesting and it involved the use of money in economic growth and development on a micro level. Very importantly though, it also encompassed how to make clean money that will last for years to come, in the process leading to progressive and sustainable macro economic development.

One of the guest speakers was Mr. Amos Wekesa, founder, Great Lakes Safaris ltd who also happens to be my mentor. He emphasised the importance of saving and living not only within, but also below our means.

He argued that this would potentially reduce the amount of debt that many people usually accumulate from unecessary liabilities like luxurious cars. These spending habits in many cases also result in the vicious cycle of borrowing. However; “When you save money, one day that money will save you.” Amos Wekesa added.

We should always endeavor to live within our means, and use the money that we have to make a positive and significant difference in our economy.

Until next time…

Is Economic freedom a mith?

In a society in which nearly everybody is dominated by somebody else’s mind or by a disembodied mind, it becomes increasingly difficult to learn the truth about the activities of governments and corporations, about the quality or value of products, or about the health of one’s own place and economy.

In such a society, also, our private economies will depend less and less upon the private ownership of real, usable property, and more and, more upon property that is institutional and abstract, beyond individual control, such as money, insurance policies, certificates of deposit, stocks and shares. And our private economies become more abstract, the mutual, free helps and pleasures of family and community life will be supplanted by a kind of displaced citizenship and by commerce with impersonal and self interested suppliers. Thus although we arenot slaves in name, and cannot be carried to market and sold as somebody else’s legal chattels, we are free only within narrow limits.

For all our talk about liberation and personal autonomy, there are few choices that we are free to make. What would bethe point, for example, if a majority of our people decided to be self-employed?

The great enemy of freedom is the alignment of political power with wealth. This alignment destroys the commonwealth that is, the natural wealth of localities and the local economies of household neighborhood, and community and so destroys democracy, of which the commonwealth is the foundation and practical means. Wendell Berry

Planting trees: A huge leap towards fighting climate change.

As trees grow, they help to stop climate change by removing carbondioxide from the air, storing the carbondioxide in the leaves and soil, as well as releasing oxygen into the atmosphere. Trees provide many benefits to us every day, they offer cooling shades, attract birds and wildlife, purify our air, prevent soil erosion, clean our water, and add grace and beauty to our homes and communities.

An alternative to cereals as animal and fish feeds is imminent.

Cereals have for years, if not centuries been used as feeds for animals, fish and chicken. With the current shortage in production being a result of the prevalent drought especially in the tropical regions, it is imminent that a suitable alternative be found as soon as now.

There should be a significant reduction in the use of cereals as feeds. This can be done in a “green” economy by increasing food energy efficiency using fish discards, capture and recycling of post harvest losses, waste and development of new technology, thereby increasing food energy efficiency by 30-50% at the current production levels.

According to The Environmental Food Crisis, increasing the food energy efficiency provides a critical path for significant growth in food supply without compromising environmental sustainability.

As a result, the individuals living in drought stricken regions could have an extra meal or two contrary to what they can currently afford.

Celebrating the women in my life.

Today’s post is dedicated to the women across the globe, especially those whom I have had the priviledge to interact with in various capacities.

Beautiful woman, come out and play, reveal your inner treasures. The sparkle in your eyes, the natural swing in your walk, you radiate excitement and enthusiasm. You need no latest fashion, No expensive hair cuts, No blinding big accessories. You glow in your passions, passionate in your pursuits you know what you are made of. You are not easily bothered by the mindless opinions of others, you know very well where you want to go. You are a joy to watch, an inspiration to others, your pure soul an endless marvel. Beautiful woman, let your brilliance shine through, your eyes speak of true inner beauty. Fion Lim

Today, I celebrate you. Happy Women’s Day!

A short term move to enhance food security.

Inorder to decrease the risk of highly volatile prices, price regulation on commodities and larger cereal stocks should be created to buffer the tight markets of food commodities and subsequent risks of speculation in markets.

This includes reorganizing the food market infrastructure and institutions to regulate food prices and provide food safety nets aimed at alleviating the impact of rising food prices and food shortage, including both direct and indirect transfers, such as a global fund to support micro-finance to boost small-scale farmer productivity. The Environmental Food Crisis

Being innovative and adapting to the changing times.

We ought to support farmers in developing diversified and resilient eco-agriculture systems that provide critical ecosystem services (water supply and regulation, habitat for wild plants and animals genetic diversity, pollination, pest control, climate regulation), as well as adequate food to meet local and consumer needs.

This also includes managing extreme rainfall and using inter-cropping to minimize dependency on external inputs like artificial fertilizers, pesticides, irrigation water and the development, implementation and support of green technology for small-scale farmers. The Environmental Food Crisis.

Could post harvest preservation systems be a remedy to food shortage?

Food waste contributes greatly to world hunger. One solution includes placing a greater emphasis on post-harvest food preservation methods such as solar refridgeration, intelligent packaging and creating a world food preservation center. Charles. L. Wilson, Ph.D